Editorial Boards Concur: Vote Yes on Prop 69

Early morning traffic makes its way along the 91 Freeway in Riverside County. A new report from a nonpartisan think tank finds that the recently passed $52.4 billion transportation funding bill, which raises the gas tax by 12 cents a gallon, isn't a long-term solution for California's transportation needs.

Early morning traffic makes its way along the 91 Freeway in Riverside County. A new report from a nonpartisan think tank finds that the recently passed $52.4 billion transportation funding bill, which raises the gas tax by 12 cents a gallon, isn’t a long-term solution for California’s transportation needs.

Editorial Boards across California continue to positively endorse Proposition 69.
Here’s a summary of the latest endorsements:

San Francisco Chronicle
The Legislature and Gov. Brown last year combined on Senate Bill 1 — a 12-cent gas tax to repair California’s crumbling and essential roads. Now comes this measure [Prop 69] to assure wary voters that the $5 billion per year in tax revenue will go to asphalt work and transportation projects as promised. If that reassurance seems unnecessary, it’s because anti-tax opponents are readying a repeal of the gas tax, claiming the funds may be diverted or misspent. For anyone driving potholed roads or tiring of fist-pounding traffic delays, that argument should sound ridiculous. California is at last tending to its highways, and this measure underlines that promise. Vote Yes.

The Fresno Bee
The 12-cent gas tax increase passed last year by California lawmakers [SB 1] was the first in 23 years, and, gauging from the number of potholes in need of filling, it was way overdue. This companion measure [Prop 69] would ensure that $5 billion in new revenue only gets spent on transportation projects. While most transportation revenue is already constitutionally earmarked, some of the new funding falls outside those protections, so this is just common-sense cleanup, endorsed by a long list of good government groups. Nonetheless, some anti-tax hardliners and talk radio chatterers oppose this measure, largely because they hope to repeal the whole gas tax in November. They’re wrong. Few states rely more on highways than California. Safe roads are a basic government function. And the gas tax is a bargain, costing most Californians little more than the price of a beer a month. Proposition 69: Yes

The Bakersfield Californian
Sadly, Prop. 69 should not be necessary. But the truth is that we don’t trust our legislators – especially our future ones. This initiative will place in the state constitution language that will require future legislators to honor the commitment made by today’s legislators. Senate Bill 1, which was passed last year and signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown, required a 12-cents-per-gallon increase in gas tax, a 20-cent-per-gallon increase in the diesel fuel tax and the annual fee charged owners of electric cars to be spent on “transportation projects.” But the state constitution does not tie these taxes to those particular uses and future legislators could rip off the money to fund other programs and services. Proposition 69 places the spending
requirement in the state constitution. Vote YES on Prop. 69.

Orange County Register
Whatever one believes about the wisdom of recently enacted gas tax and vehicle-registration fee increases, most will likely agree that those revenues should be used to improve California’s transportation infrastructure. Proposition 69 offers Californians an opportunity to ensure that the additional taxes and fees from Senate Bill 1 actually go towards transportation. Given the amount of revenues SB 1 is dealing with, it’s important to have some degree of certainty that
that money will go toward its intended purposes. On balance, we suggest voting yes on Proposition 69.


Southern California Partnership for Jobs supports infrastructure investment. We advocated for the passage of SB 1, a new transportation funding source that is becoming ever more critical for California. We believe that all funds raised through SB 1 should be used for transportation as intended and support the passage of Prop. 69.

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